Edible Plants to Grow During Winter

It’s important to make sure we get plenty of vitamins and minerals during the cooler months, to help give our bodies a fighting chance against colds and flus. What better way to do this than from the fruits and veggies grown right in our own backyards?!

While winter can seem like a time in which not many things are willing to grow, there are a variety of fruits and veggies that will produce crops during the season. Some of these are annual plants that complete their life cycle within a short period of time and then die off, while others are perennials, and can continue to produce crops for years to come. 

In this article, we take a look at a selection of different plants that produce fruits and vegetables during the cooler months. Bear in mind that some of these plants may need to be planted in a different season, and their crops harvested during next year’s winter. In that case, you may want to read how to prepare your garden for planting winter vegetables.

Spring Onions


Despite the name, spring onion seeds can be sown in the winter. These versatile veggies are simple to grow, and can be grown and picked year-round in many parts of Australia, and added to a variety of dishes. They are ready for harvesting around 8 to 12 weeks after they are planted. There are claims that spring onions make a good companion plant, as the scent they give off can help to keep insects away from other plants and veggies nearby. 

Sweet corn

In warmer, tropical regions of Australia, vegetables such as sweet corn can be planted all year-round, including during the winter. Sweet corn tends to grow tall, sometimes reaching heights of over 2 metres. This vegetable needs plenty of nutrients to grow big and strong, so it’s important to ensure you soil is prepared and healthy before planting. Sweet corn can be harvested around 8 to 10 weeks after planting, and cooked and eaten straight off the cob, or added to soups and stir-frys.

Lemons


Packed with Vitamin C, lemons are a fruit that grows in the winter months. If you’re looking to plant a citrus tree, and are in a colder Aussie environment, the best time to do so is in the spring. In warmer and tropical climates, lemon trees may be planted year-round. It can take a little while for the trees to mature enough to start producing fruit, and for the first one to two years, any fruit that is produced should be removed to allow the plant more energy. These plants grow best in healthy soil with plenty of nutrients, so a healthy dose of compost and manure can help your lemon tree thrive. 

Fruits and vegetables not only taste delicious, they are also good for helping keep our bodies happy and healthy. There is a wide selection of plants that produce crops during the winter, with some being annuals that are harvested once and then die off, and others being perennials that can produce crops for many winters to come. If you’re looking to get started on the veggie patch, or plant a fruit tree, there are plenty of options to start with, regardless of the time of year, and there’s no reason to let the cool winter months stop you from getting started!

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